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Today 99.534 Million Americans Unemployed Uncounted Unreported

  • By LEED GA, Charlene on Green
www.charleneongreen.org The real unemployment number is 41.6 percent. Of the 311,481 million Americans, 239,313,000 made up the population of those who were "fit for work" and who "could be working" in May 2011. However, 153,693,000 were counted in the civilian workforce as "should be working" that is 64.2 percent of the "could be's" were actually counted. But, only 58.4 percent of the "should be's" were actually working. See the raw uncut, unfudged, unemployment numbers...

The rest of the "should be's" 9.1 percent that is 13.9 million Americans is the number the Obama Administration counts as unemployed. What about the greater number 85,620,000 "could be's" who are not counted or should I say counted as "not in the workforce." Well when you add the 85,620,000 plus the 13,914,000 the result is that 99.534 million Americans are not working, but "could be working" under the right economic conditions. http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

Household data, seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]

Employment status

May
2010
Mar.
2011
Apr.
2011
May
2011
Change from:
Apr.
2011-
May
2011

Civilian noninstitutional population

237,499 239,000 239,146 239,313 167
Civilian labor force 154,237 153,406 153,421 153,693 272

Participation rate

64.9 64.2 64.2 64.2 0.0

Employed

139,353 139,864 139,674 139,779 105

Employment-population ratio

58.7 58.5 58.4 58.4 0.0

Unemployed

14,884 13,542 13,747 13,914 167

Unemployment rate

9.6 8.8 9.0 9.1 0.1

Not in labor force

83,262 85,594 85,725 85,620 -105

 

HOUSEHOLD DATA measures of labor underutilizationNot seasonally adjustedSeasonally adjusted
May
2010
Apr.
2011
May
2011
May
2010
Jan.
2011
Feb.
2011
Mar.
2011
Apr.
2011
May
2011

U-1 Persons unemployed 15 weeks or longer, as a percent of the civilian labor force

5.9 5.5 5.5 5.8 5.5 5.3 5.3 5.1 5.3

U-2 Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs, as a percent of the civilian labor force

5.7 5.2 5.1 6.0 5.6 5.4 5.4 5.3 5.4

U-3 Total unemployed, as a percent of the civilian labor force (official unemployment rate)

9.3 8.7 8.7 9.6 9.0 8.9 8.8 9.0 9.1

U-4 Total unemployed plus discouraged workers, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus discouraged workers

10.0 9.2 9.2 10.3 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.5 9.5

U-5 Total unemployed, plus discouraged workers, plus all other persons marginally attached to the labor force, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force

10.6 10.1 10.0 10.9 10.7 10.5 10.3 10.4 10.3

U-6 Total unemployed, plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force, plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force

16.1 15.5 15.4 16.5 16.1 15.9 15.7 15.9 15.8

NOTE: Persons marginally attached to the labor force are those who currently are neither working nor looking for work but indicate that they want and are available for a job and have looked for work sometime in the past 12 months. Discouraged workers, a subset of the marginally attached, have given a job-market related reason for not currently looking for work. Persons employed part time for economic reasons are those who want and are available for full-time work but have had to settle for a part-time schedule. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- MAY 2011 Nonfarm payroll employment changed little (+54,000) in May, and the unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 9.1 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Job gains continued in professional and business services, health care, and mining. Employment levels in other major private-sector industries were little changed, and local government employment continued to decline.

Household Survey Data The number of unemployed persons (13.9 million) and the unemployment rate (9.1 percent) were essentially unchanged in May. The labor force, at 153.7 million, was little changed over the month. (See table A-1.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (8.9 percent), adult women (8.0 percent), teenagers (24.2 percent), whites (8.0 percent), blacks (16.2 percent), and Hispanics (11.9 percent) showed little or no change in May. The jobless rate for Asians was 7.0 percent, not seasonally adjusted. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.

In May, the number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over) increased by 361,000 to 6.2 million; their share of unemployment increased to 45.1 percent. (See table A-12.

The civilian labor force participation rate was 64.2 percent for the fifth consecutive month. The employment-population ratio remained at 58.4 percent in May. (See table A-1.

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged in May at 8.5 million. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job. (See table A-8.

In May, 2.2 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, about the same as a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.

Among the marginally attached, there were 822,000 discouraged workers in May, a decrease of 261,000 from a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.

Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.4 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in May had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities. (See table A-16.

Establishment Survey Data Total nonfarm payroll employment was little changed in May (+54,000), following gains that averaged 220,000 in the prior 3 months. Private-sector employment continued to trend up (+83,000), although by a much smaller amount than the average for the prior 3 months (+244,000). In May, job gains occurred in professional and business services, health care, and mining. Local government employment continued to trend down. Employment in other major industries changed little over the month. (See table B-1.

Employment in professional and business services continued to increase in May (+44,000).

Notable job gains occurred in accounting and bookkeeping services (+18,000) and in computer systems design and related services (+8,000). Employment in temporary help services was little changed.

Health care employment continued to expand in May (+17,000). Employment in the industry had risen by an average of 24,000 per month over the prior 12 months.

Mining added 7,000 jobs in May. Employment in mining has risen by 115,000 since a recent low point in October 2009.

Employment in manufacturing changed little in May (-5,000). Job gains in fabricated metal products and in machinery were offset by losses in transportation equipment, paper and paper products, and printing and related support activities. The manufacturing industry added 243,000 jobs from a recent low point in December 2009 through April 2011.

Construction employment was essentially unchanged in May. Employment in the industry has shown little movement on net since early 2010, after having fallen sharply during the 2007-09 period.

Employment in local government continued to decline over the month (-28,000). Local government has lost 446,000 jobs since an employment peak in September 2008.

Employment in other major industries, including retail trade, transportation and warehousing, information, financial activities, and leisure and hospitality, changed little in May.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls remained at 34.4 hours in May. The manufacturing workweek for all employees increased by 0.2 hour to 40.6 hours over the month, while factory overtime was unchanged at 3.2 hours. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls was 33.6 hours in May. (See tables B-2 and B-7.

In May, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 6 cents, or 0.3 percent, to $22.98. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings increased by 1.8 percent. In May, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees rose by 6 cents, or 0.3 percent, to $19.43. (See tables B-3 and B-8.

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for March was revised from +221,000 to +194,000, and the change for April was revised from +244,000 to +232,000.

___________ The Employment Situation for June is scheduled to be released on Friday, July 8, 2011, at 8:30 a.m. (EDT). 

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